ecodives

DIVING TIPS FOR SAVING AIR

When we dive, always keep in mind that air in our tanks gets never stops, lasts forever. So we can dive for a long time to explore the beauty of Ocean. I would like to share some diving tips to help you to conserve your oxygen and extend your bottom time.

DO MIND THE SMALL LEAKS
Even a small stream of bubbles from an O-ring or inflator swivel adds up over 30-40 Mt’s, and maybe a sign of more serious trouble ahead anyway.

DIVE DIVE DIVE DIVE
Inexperienced divers are famous for burning through their air supply at a furious rate, so one of the best diving tips for saving air is to simply dive more often. You may not be a skilled diver, but unless you dive almost every week it’s still an unnatural activity. By diving more, your body will get used to the idea, and you’ll breathe less.

SWIMM SLOWLY…. SLOWLY….
The energy cost of speed is even more than you might think: Swim half as fast as you do now, and you’ll use less air. So go slow. Swim slow, turn slowly, reach slowly for your console, do everything in slow motion and come to terms with the slow movement of your body with the water. Hence you must swim slow.
Usually currents are weaker at the bottom or along a wall. Use your hands. Where appropriate, pull yourself rock-to-rock, hand-over-hand, across the bottom. Obviously please don’t touch corals and other living forms.

STAY WARM
Your body burns calories and consumes oxygen to generate heat, so conserve it. Wear a hood or beanie, even in warm water.

SHORT FIN STROKES
Besides finning slowly, keep the strokes short. Wide fin strokes move a lot of water but give only little more propulsion.

BETTER FINS
Some fins are more efficient at translating muscle power into movement. A good pair means you’ll kick with less effort, and less often.

MINIMIZE LEAD WEIGHT
If you’re overweighted, you have to put more air into your BC to float it and be neutral. The inflated BC is larger and requires more energy and oxygen to push it through the water. An extra eight pounds of lead means your BC is one gallon bigger when inflated enough to make you neutral.

EXHALE COMPLETELEY
This reduces the “dead air” volume and eliminates as much carbon dioxide as possible, thus delaying the urge to take another breath.
Take a pause after inhaling. Use your diaphragm to hold air in your lungs for few extra seconds while keeping your throat open. This allows even more time for gas exchange. Your breathing pattern should be: “Exhale, Inhale, Pause. Exhale, Inhale, Pause”.

content source : scuba diving magazine

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